• Kumpula, Sipi (1887–1933)

    Kumpula, Sipi (1887–1933) (2)

    Sipi Kumpula (1887–January 19, 1933 Helsinki) was a Finnish cantor-organist and composer. He was born in the village of Käylä in Kuusamo and first came from his home farm to Oulu to study tailoring. However, the central content of the group's life was organ music. After attending the cantor and organ school in Helsinki, he ended up at the Helsinki…
  • Tuuri, Jaakko (1884–1947)

    Tuuri, Jaakko (1884–1947) (8)

    Jaakko Tuuri (19 March 1884 Ylistaro–2 March 1947 Hämeenlinna) was a Finnish composer. Tuuri graduated as a cantor-organist from the Cantor-organist school in Helsinki in 1905, studied at the Helsinki Music College in 1907–1909 and vocal studies in 1909, and made a study trip to Dresden in 1911–1912. Tuuri worked as acting manager of Ylistaro, as cantor-organist 1903–1905, Kemi's cantor-organist 1909–1917…
  • Anderssén, Alfred (1887–1940)

    Anderssén, Alfred (1887–1940) (2)

    Alfred Anderssén (4 August 1887 Pietarsaari Rural Municipality - 10 September 1940 Turku) was a Finnish composer. Anderssén's parents were Johan Anderssén and Johanna Holmberg, first married to Emma Ahlskog and second since 1920 to Karin Matilda Limnell. Before studying at the Helsinki Music Institute, Anderssén received piano instruction from organist Alfred Lybäck. Anderssén also made study trips to Germany.…
  • Bach, Johann Sebastian (1685-1750)

    Bach, Johann Sebastian (1685-1750) (10)

    Johann Sebastian Bach (21 March 1685 - 28 July 1750) was a German composer and organist whose sacred and secular works for choir, orchestra, and solo instruments drew together the strands of the Baroque period and brought it to its ultimate maturity. Although he introduced no new forms, he enriched the prevailing German style with a robust contrapuntal technique, an…
  • Beethoven, Ludwig van (1770–1827)

    Beethoven, Ludwig van (1770–1827) (4)

    Ludwig van Beethoven (16 December 1770 – 26 March 1827) was a German composer and pianist. He was a crucial figure in the transitional period between the Classical and Romantic eras in Western classical music, and remains one of the most acclaimed and influential composers of all time. Born in Bonn, then in the Electorate of Cologne in western Germany,…
  • Blumenfeld, Felix (1863–1931)

    Blumenfeld, Felix (1863–1931) (4)

    Felix Mikhailovich Blumenfeld (Russian: Фе́ликс Миха́йлович Блуменфе́льд; 19 April 1863 [O.S. 7 April] – 21 January 1931) was a Russian composer, conductor of the Imperial Opera St-Petersburg, pianist, and teacher. He was born in Kirovograd (in present day Ukraine), Kherson Governorate, Russian Empire, the son of Mikhail Frantsevich Blumenfeld, of Austrian Jewish origin, and the Pole Maria Szymanowska. He studied…
  • Crusell, Bernhard (1775–1838)

    Crusell, Bernhard (1775–1838) (2)

    Bernhard Henrik Crusell (born October 15, 1775 in Nystad, Finland, † July 28, 1838 in Stockholm) was a Finnish clarinetist and composer. At the age of 12 he became a clarinetist in a military band in Sveaborg. He later moved to Stockholm, where he became court musician in 1793. After a stay in Berlin, where he was tutored by Franz…
  • d'Albert, Eugen (1864–1932)

    d'Albert, Eugen (1864–1932) (2)

    Educated in Britain, d'Albert showed early musical talent and, at the age of seventeen, he won a scholarship to study in Austria. Feeling a kinship with German culture and music, he soon emigrated to Germany, where he studied with Franz Liszt and began a career as a concert pianist. D'Albert repudiated his early training and upbringing in England and considered…
  • Dubé, Jean (1981–)

    Dubé, Jean (1981–) (2)

    Jean Dubé, born in December 1981, internationally recognized as one of the most important young pianists of our time and is appreciated for his musicality and power. "He can play everything with absolute understanding, not to mention his phenomenal technique"( Normunds Sne, conductor director of the Riga National Orchestra, 2003). A child prodigy, he has been performing since the age…
  • Eimele, Fredrik (1804–1871)

    Eimele, Fredrik (1804–1871) (1)

    Fredrik Eimele was born in Vasa, Finland on 28 September 1804 and died in Stockholm on 24 January 1871. He was a philologist, music researcher and a composer. He studied at the Royal Academy of Turku where he took part in the Music Society’s activities and furthered his education in Tartu and St. Petersburg. Returning to Finland in 1834 he…
  • Fabritius, Ernst (1842–1899)

    Fabritius, Ernst (1842–1899) (3)

    Fabritius was born on July 2, 1842 in Vyborg, died on October 8, 1899 in Lappträsk. Fabritius studied music in Leipzig from 1857 to 1861 and then worked successfully for a few years as a violinist in concerts in both Finland and Stockholm. In 1864, due to a hand injury, he had to stop performing in concerts, but continued to…
  • Genetz, Emil (1852–1930)

    Genetz, Emil (1852–1930) (1)

    Karl Emil Moritz Genetz (October 24, 1852 – May 1, 1930) was a Finnish composer of patriotic choral works. Genetz was born in Impilahti, Finland (now in the Republic of Karelia). He became professionally employed as a language teacher, but gained prominence for his choral compositions. After studying chemistry and law at the University of Helsinki, he became a singer…
  • Granlund, John (1888–1962)

    Granlund, John (1888–1962) (8)

    John Granlund was born in Parainen 10.12.1888. After graduating in Church Music Institute in Turku he continues his studies at Leipzig Conserevatory. After working as an orgist in Hanko he moved 1921 to Turku. During decades Granlund conducted SBV mixed choir and MA male choir in Turku. He also worked as singing teacher at Åbo Academy theological faculty as well…
  • Greve, Conrad (1820–1851)

    Greve, Conrad (1820–1851) (2)

    Conrad Greve (July 8, 1820 Glückstadt Schleswig - July 30, 1851 Stockholm) was a composer, violinist and conductor who worked in Finland and, among other things, composed the first songplay of the country.
  • Grieg, Edvard (1843–1907)

    Grieg, Edvard (1843–1907) (2)

    Edvard Hagerup Grieg (15 June 1843–4 September 1907) was a Norwegian composer and pianist. He is widely considered one of the main Romantic era composers, and his music is part of the standard classical repertoire worldwide. His use and development of Norwegian folk music in his own compositions brought the music of Norway to international consciousness, as well as helping…
  • Haapalainen, Väinö (1893–1945)

    Haapalainen, Väinö (1893–1945) (4)

    Väinö Haapalainen (May 30, 1893 Rautavaara - November 8, 1945 Helsinki) was a Finnish composer, musician and choir director. Haapalainen attended the Helsinki Music College and later studied in Berlin and Leipzig. Haapalainen moved to Vyborg in 1914 and initially worked as an orchestra musician in 1919-1924, as well as as a theater and military conductor in 1924–1928. He conducted…
  • Hofmann, Josef (1876–1957)

    Hofmann, Josef (1876–1957) (6)

    Josef Casimir Hofmann (originally Józef Kazimierz Hofmann; January 20, 1876–February 16, 1957) was a Polish American pianist, composer, music teacher, and inventor. He began learning the piano very early and gave concerts in front of Warsaw audiences at the age of eight, to audiences of many European countries at the age of ten, and also to the American audiences a…
  • Holmqvist, Christian (1974–)

    Holmqvist, Christian (1974–) (4)

    Christian Holmqvist (b. 1974 in Helsinki) studied composition privately under the guidance of Lars Karlsson 1992-1996 and musicology, philosophy and literature at the University of Helsinki 1993-2002. Holmqvist’s output includes orchestral-, chamber-, instrumental and vocal music. His first orchestral work, Purgatory Triptych, was awarded with the main prize in the Kuopio Composition Contest in 1999. In 2003 Holmqvist enjoyed a…
  • Isacsson, Fredrik (1883–1962)

    Isacsson, Fredrik (1883–1962) (4)

    Fredrik Donatus Isacsson (July 13, 1883 Vestanfjärd - August 6, 1962, Naantali countryside) was a Finnish composer and church musician, director musices. Isacsson studied to be a cantor organist at the Turku Cantor and Organ School. From 1904 to 1905 he studied organ playing under Oskar Merikanto at the Helsinki College of Music. He was considered a "promising organ artist".…
  • Kerko, Harri (1968–)

    Kerko, Harri (1968–) (5)

    Harri Kerko studied at the Sibelius Academy in 1988–1997, first at the church music department (1988–1992) in Kuopio, later (1992–1997) music conducting and composing in Helsinki. His composing teacher was Tapio Nevanlinna, a Finnish composer. Harri Kerko received his Master of Music degree in 1996. Since 1995, Kerko’s works have been performed widely in various music festivals in Finland. In…
  • Kotilainen, Otto (1868–1936)

    Kotilainen, Otto (1868–1936) (1)

    Otto Kotilainen (February 5, 1868 Heinävesi - August 9, 1936 Helsinki) was a Finnish composer. He was from every part of the musical family. He practiced singing from an early age. He attended Kerma Primary School, which was also attended by the poet Alpo Noponen. They were childhood friends. Later, Noponen made lyrics to some of Kotilainen's compositions. Kotilainen graduated…
  • Kuula, Toivo (1883–1918)

    Kuula, Toivo (1883–1918) (40)

    Toivo Timoteus Kuula (7 July 1883 - 18 May 1918) was a Finnish conductor and composer. He was born in the city of Alavus, when Finland still was a Grand Duchy under Russian rule. He is known as a colorful and passionate portrayer of Finnish nature and people. A Swedish critic once said that Kuula's music reaches parts of the…
  • Lenkiewicz, Albert (1988–)

    Lenkiewicz, Albert (1988–) (1)

    Albert Lenkiewicz (b. 1988, Jalasjärvi) began his flute studies at the age of 8 with Auli Tuohimäki. From an early age, his interest in composing, orchestral conducting and improvisation also motivated Lenkiewicz to acquire musical education by composing, conducting a youth wind orchestra, exploring various instruments through music and spontaneously exploring the history of music. The winner of the Class…
  • Levin, Ira (1958–)

    Levin, Ira (1958–) (12)

    Ira Levin is known internationally for the great versatility of his musical activities. He has conducted well over a thousand performances of 75 operatic titles and is equally at home in concert, with a vast symphonic repertoire. He has worked with many of the world’s leading instrumentalists, singers and stage directors and conducted at important opera houses and orchestras worldwide.…
  • Lichtfuss, Martin (1959–)

    Lichtfuss, Martin (1959–) (2)

    After wide-ranging studies at the Tyrolean State Conservatory in Innsbruck and at the University of Music in Vienna (composition, conducting), Martin Lichtfuss acquired extensive practical experience during 10 years as a conductor at German and Austrian theatres. From 1995–2005 he was head of Department I for music theory / musical directing, at the same time instructing a class in composition…
  • Linnavuori, Frans (1880–1926)

    Linnavuori, Frans (1880–1926) (1)

    Frans Fritiof Linnavuori (13 October 1880 Ylöjärvi – 12 July 1926 Ylöjärvi) was a Finnish composer and church musician. Frans Linnavuori completed his music studies at the Helsinki Music College and the Turku Organ School. After initially working as a cantor organist in Ylöjärvi and Leppävirta, he became the organist of Tampere Cathedral in 1908. As an organist, he organized…
  • Madetoja, Leevi (1887–1947)

    Madetoja, Leevi (1887–1947) (12)

    Leevi Antti Madetoja (17 February 1887, Oulu – 6 October 1947, Helsinki) was a Finnish composer, music critic, conductor, and teacher of the late-Romantic and early-modern periods. He is generally considered to be among the most significant Finnish composers to emerge after Jean Sibelius, under whom he studied privately from 1908–10. The core of Madetoja's oeuvre consists of a set…
  • Marttinen, Tauno (1912–2008)

    Marttinen, Tauno (1912–2008) (34)

    Tauno Marttinen Born: Helsinki, 27 Sep. 1912 Died: Turenki, 18. Jul 2008 TAUNO MARTTINEN studied music at Viipuri (Vyborg ) during the 1920s and in Helsinki during the 1930s under such teachers as Peter Akimov, Ilmari Hannikainen and Selim Palmgren. Tauno Marttinen had his sights set on a career as a concert pianist, but the emphasis swung gradually over in…
  • Melartin, Erkki (1875–1937)

    Melartin, Erkki (1875–1937) (5)

    Erkki Melartin (7 February 1875 in Käkisalmi – 14 February 1937 in Pukinmäki) was a Finnish composer and pupil of Martin Wegelius from 1892 to 1899 in Helsinki, and Robert Fuchs from 1899 to 1901 in Vienna. As well as composing, Melartin also taught and directed music at the Helsinki Music College, later the Helsinki Conservatory. As conductor of the…
  • Merikanto, Aarre (1893–1958)

    Merikanto, Aarre (1893–1958) (6)

    Aarre Merikanto (29 June 1893 Helsinki–28 September 1958 Helsinki) was a Finnish composer. He was the son of Liisa Häyrynen and composer Oskar Merikanto. Along with Einojuhani Rautavaara and Jean Sibelius, he is one of the most important Finnish composers. Aarre Merikanto studied music in Helsinki in 1911, at the Leipzig Conservatory under Max Reger (1912–1914) and in Moscow (1916–1917).…
  • Merikanto, Oskar (1868–1924)

    Merikanto, Oskar (1868–1924) (80)

    Oskar Merikanto (August 5, 1868—February 17, 1924) was a Finnish musician and composer. He was born to Swedish parents in Helsinki. His father, originally Frank Mattsson, changed the family name to sound more Finnish. He was notable for his variety of talents - he gave concerts all around Finland, performing on the piano and organ, conducting orchestras, and composing original…
  • Mielck, Ernst (1877–1899)

    Mielck, Ernst (1877–1899) (2)

    Mielck composed all his works in the short span of four years. His catalogue includes a large number of works in the field of chamber music, including a string quintet and a string quartet. He also composed a symphony (1897), two overtures, a concert piece for piano and orchestra as well as one for violin and orchestra, the Finnish Suite,…
  • Mikkola, Viljo (1871–1960)

    Mikkola, Viljo (1871–1960) (1)

    Mikkola attended the Turku Cantor and Organ School in 1895 and studied at the Helsinki Music College in 1897–1899. In Paris, Mikkola studied singing and organ playing from 1900 to 1901 and made study trips to Germany in 1920 and 1929 and to Italy in 1929. Mikkola was the cantor of Turku Cathedral from 1901 to 1907 and the organist…
  • Nummi, Seppo (1932–1981)

    Nummi, Seppo (1932–1981) (8)

    Seppo Antero Nummi (30 May 1932 Oulu – 1 August 1981, Tampere) was a Finnish critic, composer and cultural administrator. He was one of the founders of the Jyväskylä Summer Festival, and was its artistic director, and he also was the executive director of the Helsinki Festival. As a composer, Nummi was most interested in solo Song. The texts of…
  • Pahlman, Oscar (1839–1935)

    Pahlman, Oscar (1839–1935) (8)

    Oscar Adam Pahlman (1839–1935) was a Finnish church musician. He was an organist in Vaasa from 1866 to 1876, and in Turku from 1876. He founded the Turku Locksmith and Organ School with C. G. Wasenius in 1878 and served as its director and teacher until 1928. Pahlman studied as a Finnish state scholarship holder in Dresden, Germany from 1862…
  • Palmgren, Selim (1878–1951)

    Palmgren, Selim (1878–1951) (50)

    Selim Gustaf Adolf Palmgren (16 February 1878 – 13 December 1951) was a Finnish composer, pianist, and conductor. Palmgren was born in Pori, Finland, February 16, 1878. He studied at the Conservatory in Helsinki from 1895 to 1899, then continued his piano studies in Berlin with Ansorge, Berger and Busoni. He conducted choral and orchestral societies in his own country…
  • Pasquet, Luis (1917–2013)

    Pasquet, Luis (1917–2013) (1)

    Luis Pasquet was born 1917 in the city of Salto, Uruguay and studied both music and chemistry in Uruguay's capital Montevideo. Early on his career he became interested in impressionistic and expressionistic music as well as jazz. His compositions are an elegant mixture of all these styles, influenced by his long and colourful career as a band leader in Uruguay…
  • Pingoud, Ernest (1887–1942)

    Pingoud, Ernest (1887–1942) (1)

    Born in Saint Petersburg, Pingoud was a pupil of the Russian composers Anton Rubinstein, Alexander Glazunov and Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov at the Saint Petersburg Conservatory. He also took private lessons with Alexander Siloti, who had come to know the family when he became a neighbour of their summer residence at Tikkala Manor near Viipuri on the Karelian Isthmus. In 1906, he…
  • Rachmaninoff, Sergei (1873–1943)

    Rachmaninoff, Sergei (1873–1943) (1)

    Rachmaninoff was a Russian composer, pianist, and conductor. Rachmaninoff is widely considered one of the finest pianists of his day and, as a composer, one of the last great representatives of Romanticism in Russian classical music. Early influences of Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, and other Russian composers gave way to a thoroughly personal idiom that included a pronounced lyricism, expressive breadth, structural…
  • Raitio, Väinö (1891–1945)

    Raitio, Väinö (1891–1945) (6)

    Väinö Eerikki Raitio (15 April 1891 in Sortavala, Grand Duchy of Finland – 10 September 1945 in Helsinki) was part of the small group of composers who appeared in the Finnish art music scene in the 1920s with a new cosmopolitan music style, very different from the dominant conservative National Romanticism. Raitio's career as a composer reached its peak in…
  • Ranta, Sulho (1901–1960)

    Ranta, Sulho (1901–1960) (5)

    Sulho Ranta (1901-1960) studied composition in Helsinki with Erkki Melartin in 1921–24 and continued his studies in Berlin, Vienna, Italy and Paris. Back in Finland he was active as a theatre conductor, teacher and music critic, also writing and editing textbooks on the theory and history of music. From 1936 to 1956 he was vice-rector of the Sibelius Academy. As…
  • Rydman, Kari (1936–)

    Rydman, Kari (1936–) (7)

    Kari Rydman, professor h.c., has written orchestra and chamber music, a large number of choral compositions and arrangements, song cycles, and as a singer he has recorded his own songs between the genres Lied and chanson. In addition to being a composer, he has taught, written books and press columns and made a wide range of radio programmes on the…
  • Törnudd, Axel (1874–1923)

    Törnudd, Axel (1874–1923) (1)

    Axel Olof Törnudd (December 15, 1874 Tampere – July 19, 1923 Helsinki) was Finnish music teacher and composer. Törnudd studied cello playing and music theory at the Helsinki Orchestra School 1891–94 and the Helsinki College of Music, from which he graduated in 1898. Törnudd worked for a few in Helsinki except for the intervening years 1899–1919 as a music lecturer…
  • Tscherlizki, Ivan Karl. (1799-1867)

    Tscherlizki, Ivan Karl. (1799-1867) (1)

    Born: November 20, 1799 - Kazan, Russia Died: June 6, 1865 - St. Petersburg, Russia Ivan Karlovitch Tscherlitzky [Czerlitzky, Scherlitzky] (Russian: Иван Карлович Черлицкий) was a Russian organist, pianist, composer and teacher. He first was taught by his father Karl (1773-1841) and later in 1831 became a piano student of John Field in Moscow. Since 1818 Ivan Tscherlitzky lived in…
  • Tuomisalo, Olli-Pekka (1970–)

    Tuomisalo, Olli-Pekka (1970–) (1)

    Olli-Pekka Tuomisalo (b. 1970) graduated with the degree Doctor of Music from the Sibelius Academy as the first saxophonist ever. His first compositions – for a hard rock band – saw daylight back in the 1980´s. Step by step his style has moved towards where it is now: combining the different sides of his musicianship: classical, jazz, rock and funk.
  • Wessman, Harri (1949–)

    Wessman, Harri (1949–) (2)

    Harri Wessman was born in Helsinki, Finland, in 1949. As a composer he is interested in all aspects of music that may be expressive, without in any way ignoring the possibilities of melody. He himself describes his harmonic method as a kind of contrapuntally treated jazz harmony. Wessman is particularly preoccupied with the ability of music to express emotions, an…